We have previously reported here at Health Impact News how authorities in India are now providing information to families planning to visit or work in the United States in helping them to avoid having their children kidnapped by Child Protection Services. The Sunday Guardian reported: "Young Indian couples travelling to the United States on short to mid-term job assignments are increasingly facing the menace of child confiscation by the country’s child protection agencies, who wrongly accuse them of abuse. The 'child abuse' is determined using the controversial Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) indicator, the veracity of which is contested. Suranya Aiyar, a New-Delhi based lawyer, who has been providing counsel and aid to Indian families in the US, Norway and other countries to help them get back their confiscated children, recently submitted a 'Report on Indian and India-Origin Children Confiscated by the United States Child Protection Agencies' to the Ministry of External Affairs. Based on her extensive case study of 12 Indian families, who were falsely accused of child abuse, her report sheds light on the US agencies’ many biases and flawed methodology. The report wants a travel advisory to be issued to young Indian families moving to the US of possible confiscation of their children as, in most cases, the victim families are not aware of what might goad the child protection agencies to initiate action against them." Last year (2018) Indian mother and attorney Suranya Aiyar was awarded a laureate by the Nordic Committee for Human Rights (NCHR). NCHR is a human rights organization specializing in advocacy against wrongful child removals by child protection agencies in Nordic countries. In her acceptance speech, attorney Aiyar appeals to policymakers in India to resist and reject the Western models of child protection. Such is the sad state of affairs here in the U.S. today, where attorneys and policy makers in other countries must issue travel advisories and warn against child kidnappings by American child "protection" agencies.

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