• As American Heart Association Prepares to Revise Guidelines for Cholesterol, Harvard Doctor Speaks Out on Conflict of Interests

    The American Heart Association (AHA) will soon be meeting in Chicago to set new guidelines for treating high cholesterol, the first big update since 2013. Medical doctors are not at all unified in their position on cholesterol-lowering statin drugs, although pharmaceutical companies and their front groups, such as the AHA, would like the public to believe all doctors are in favor of lowering cholesterol via medication. Independent journalist Sharyl Attkisson recently covered the issue of the "Statin Wars" on her TV show, Full Measure. In the introduction to her show, Attkisson states: "Past (cholesterol) guidelines have said more and more of us should take cholesterol-lowering drugs called “statins” to prevent heart attacks and save lives. But the recommendations aren’t without controversy. And they raise a larger debate in medicine— over who’s paying the doctors and groups deciding what’s good for us." She interviewed three people with different perspectives on statin drugs.

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  • As American Heart Association Prepares to Revise Guidelines for Cholesterol, Harvard Doctor Speaks Out on Conflict of Interests

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25655639

    Statins inhibit the synthesis of vitamin K2, the matrix Gla-protein and calcitonin activator. Magnesium along with Vitamin K2 keeps calcium regulated from building up in places you don’t want it such as the arteries. Calcium loses all its beneficial qualities and is harmful to the body when its displaced, and become insoluble (hard) without the vitamin K2 and magnesium. Statins may paradoxically lead to calcium buildup and atherosclerosis by inhibiting the very K2 needed to help remove the calcium..

    Statins also inhibit the biosynthesis of selenium containing proteins, one of which is glutathione peroxidase serving to suppress peroxidative stress. An impairment of selenoprotein biosynthesis may be a factor in congestive heart failure, reminiscent of the dilated cardiomyopathies seen with selenium deficiency. Thus, the epidemic of heart failure and atherosclerosis that plagues the modern world may paradoxically be aggravated by the pervasive use of statin drugs. Selenoproteins are needed for thyroid T4 to T3 conversion as well as many other important functions.