• Studies Link Canine Cancers to Lawn Chemicals

    Lawn chemicals, particularly, ones containing 2,4-D, have been linked to at least two types of canine cancers. Studies found that lawn chemicals travel to neighboring yards and inside homes, and chemicals have been found in the urine of dogs whose owners did not spray their lawns. A six-year study from Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine linked lawn pesticides to canine malignant lymphoma (CML). Based on questionnaire results from dog owners, the study found “specifically, the use of professionally applied pesticides was associated with a significant 70% higher risk of CML. Risk was also higher in those reporting use of self-applied insect growth regulators.”

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  • Studies Link Canine Cancers to Lawn Chemicals

    My dog died of bladder cancer in May. The community I live in uses pesticides containing dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on our lawns. When I told the Gordon setter breeder from whom we purchased our dog that bladder cancer killed him, she said, "That's a new one on me." So, it likely has nothing to do with predisposition.