An agreement among representatives on both sides of the aisle in the United States House of Representatives has retained the bill that prohibits the Department of Justice (DOJ) from using its allocated funds for DEA interventions in states that allow cannabis for medical purposes. It was included as part of the House final appropriations budget for the fiscal year 2018, which ends September 30, 2018. 62 Congress members from both sides of the aisle have decided to start pushing now for the 2019 inclusion of this protective provision with a letter which included the following: "We believe that the consistent, bipartisan support for such protections against federal enforcement, combined with the fact that similar language has been in place since December 2014, makes a strong case for including similar language in your base FY 2019 appropriations bill." The Marijuana Justice Act, introduced by Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), would end the federal prohibition on marijuana once and for all, by removing the drug from the DEA’s list of controlled substances entirely. The Marijuana Justice Act, introduced by Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ), would end the federal prohibition on marijuana once and for all, by removing the drug from the DEA’s list of controlled substances entirely. It was introduced as Senate bill number S. 1689, but thus far is without co-sponsors. Earlier, Senator Bernie Sanders had attempted to introduce a similar bill with similar results. However, a similar version of S. 1689, H.R. 1227 – Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017, was introduced into the House of Representatives by Thomas Garrett (R-Vir) and has 15 House co-sponsors. Recently, 14 members of Congress have asked to cut funding for the Drug Enforcement Administration's cannabis eradication program, writing: "Throughout the country, states are increasingly turning away from marijuana prohibition and enacting alternative policies to lower crime rates, free up limited law enforcement resources, and keep drugs out of the hands of children. Despite both the Cannabis Eradication Program’s proven ineffectiveness and the seismic shift in attitudes on marijuana policy within Congress and across our nation, the DEA continues to spend millions of taxpayer dollars on this program, spending $22 million in 2015 alone. There is no justification for spending this kind of money on an antiquated program never shown to be effective. Of course, there is some justification. It puts more non-violent marijuana users into private prisons, which were beginning to be phased out prior to this new administration with stock values plummeting. After all, the Federal Government spent 639 million dollars on 'private prisons.'"

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