The most recent study of cannabis’ protection against fatty liver disease was reported in the journal Liver International on January 18, 2018, with the title "Cannabis use is associated with reduced prevalence of progressive stages of alcoholic liver disease”[ALD]. The study was a cooperative endeavor involving several medical schools in New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and Johns Hopkins in Maryland. The researchers used data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project. They found 319,514 ALD cases aged 18 or over, and broke this massive number into four progressed phases of ALD (alcohol liver disease) and three cannabis groups according to exposure frequency, which revealed 90.39 percent didn't use cannabis; 8.26 percent were non-dependent cannabis users, and 1.36 percent were dependent cannabis users. The research results showed that among heavy drinkers and alcoholics, those who used cannabis had “significantly lower odds” of developing liver disease (ALD) characterized by alcoholic steatosis (AS), steatohepatitis (AH), fibrosis, cirrhosis (AC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), leading the authors to state: “Our findings suggest that cannabis use is associated with reduced incidence of liver disease in alcoholics."

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