A recently published study (October 2017) challenges the accepted mainstream medical theory that ovarian cancer is developed in the ovaries. The study, "Molecular analysis of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma with and without associated serous tubal intra-epithelial carcinoma," was conducted by medical researchers in 2016 at both the Sloan-Kettering Cancer Institute and Johns Hopkins. The study contends that, "For decades it was thought that ovarian carcinoma originates in the OSE or ovarian CICs, but few data supported this claim. Lesions resembling an intraepithelial carcinoma in CICs and the OSE are rare. In contrast, a putative precursor of ovarian carcinoma has been described in the fallopian tube, designated STIC, which is found frequently in association with “ovarian” HGSCs and in the fallopian tubes removed prophylactically from high-risk women. The implications of these findings are to direct efforts for prevention and early detection toward the distal fallopian tube, rather than the OSE. Ongoing and planned clinical trials are investigating bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian preservation as a viable option for ovarian cancer risk-reduction." Women are often encouraged to have their ovaries removed during an existing pelvic operation to ensure protection against ovarian cancer. Dr. Robert J. Rowen, M.D. is questioning the need for such surgeries in light of this new study. The result of surgically removing ovaries, for millions of women, according to Dr. Rowen, has been: “… a nightmare of hormonal difficulties. The ovaries do, in fact, make some hormone even after menopause and all the eggs are gone.”

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