There has been a bit of a stir recently over mainstream medical analysis that supports cannabis for treating leukemia. Unfortunately, most of it involves cannabis as an adjunct or supporting treatment for chemotherapy, while the rest supports synthetic THC for leukemia. An example of this is a 2016 study referenced in a June 2017 issue of Herb in the article “Is Cannabis Effective Against Leukemia,” which surprisingly cautiously skirted the issue of curing leukemia with cannabis. The study referenced, "Dronabinol has preferential anti-leukemic activity in acute lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia with lymphoid differentiation patterns," which basically examined the efficacy of a pharmaceutical drug called dronabinol, the active synthetic THC compound of Marinol . The study was very favorable, concluding: "Our study provides rigorous data to support clinical evaluation of THC as a low-toxic therapy option in a well defined subset of acute leukemia patients." So this synthetic THC drug dronabinol is okay with the FDA, and the DEA has it listed as a Schedule III controlled substance. Yet the whole plant cannabis commonly known as marijuana with its balanced assortment of 80 or so cannabinoids and terpenes and flavonoids that contribute to a safe synergistic entourage effect of healing is still listed as Schedule I, dangerous, addictive, and without medical merit.

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