Whenever parasites are mentioned it is usually considered a third world or developing nation issue. Phrases such as “lovely place, nice people, but don’t drink the water” are common jokes that have some basis in truth. Although our culture is programmed to think all illnesses are derived from viruses and some bacteria, the USA also has its share of parasite issues. The CDC openly admits this in a May 2017 report on its website: "Outbreaks of a parasitic infection linked to swimming pools and water playgrounds are increasingly being reported to CDC, with twice as many outbreaks in 2016 as in 2014." Notice the word "outbreaks" is used, not "cases." The outbreaks recorded from a few states with using a recently installed tracking system involved hundreds of cases reported, overflowing into the thousands range. This specific parasite invasion was from the microscopic Cryptosporidium, aka Crypto, which has a capacity for surviving prescribed pool chlorine content requirements. The chlorine levels in municipal tap water can’t handle this parasite either. There was a neti-pot scare a few years ago when a few folks died from a brain eating amoeba after using their neti-pot with tap water or swimming in fresh water lakes of ponds during summer months. So maybe it’s time to focus a bit more on parasites instead of viruses that sometimes don’t really exist and are usually more difficult to spread than parasites?

Read full story...