In January 2016, Hillary Clinton unveiled an autism initiative that was focused on bringing greater awareness to the epidemic. Clinton, who has received more pharmaceutical industry money than any leading political figure in the United States, wants “to ensure that all children, and in particular children from underserved backgrounds, can get screened for autism.” Reading between the political red tape and double speak, Clinton and the pharmaceutical industry are looking to create a funnel to drive millions affected by the autism spectrum into the drug company’s arms. There is a lot of buzz these days coming from the political and medical hot potato that is medical cannabis (marijuana). Many states are wrestling with current legislation, desperate not to give full control of this plant’s healing powers over to the people without high taxes and tracking systems. Two major events have just occurred within the last week. First, Pennsylvania is moving to become the first state to list autism as a qualifying condition for medical marijuana. If Pennsylvania’s SB3 becomes law, it will legally protect doctors who want to prescribe medical marijuana. In addition, the law would give parents and their children access to a powerful medical tool that would be covered by insurance. The second major event that is currently in the works is the world’s first official crowdfunded medical marijuana study at Colorado State University. Headed by Thorsten Rudroff, director of Colorado State University’s (CSU) Integrative Neurophysiology Lab, the study aims to conduct tests on at least 20 MS patients in northern Colorado who already are using medical marijuana and compare them with members of a control group of the same size who do not.

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